Vegetables and Recipes

Asian Greens
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Asparagus
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Click here to see recipes with Asparagus

Beans
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Beets
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Bok Choy (Baby)
The little bok choy leaves can be added to salad, tossed in a stir-fry or used to scoop up hummus.

Broccoli
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Broccoli Raab
Broccoli raab is a cross between kale and broccoli and is delicious sautéed and added to a quiche or tossed with pasta.

Cabbage
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Carrots
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Cauliflower
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Celeriac
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Celery
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Chili Pepper
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Corn, Sweet
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Cucumber
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Delicate Greens
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Eggplant
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Fennel
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Garlic
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Garlic, Green
This is garlic freshly-dug from the field, not yet dried – so you can store it in a plastic bag in the frig and use a knife to carefully cut into the skin to find the cloves inside. You can use the cloves just like regular garlic.

Hakurei Turnips
These mild little roots are great on a veggie tray, or sautéed briefly with their greens – the mix can be added to quiche, served on rice with chicken or tofu or mixed into pasta. If you’d like to store these for a while, it’s best to cut the greens off the roots and store them separately.
Irish Potatoes
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Kale
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Kohlrabi
This mild, crispy bulb – it’s actually a swollen stem – is good peeled thickly, then sliced thinly in salads or for a veggie tray. They’re also good julienned and added to a stir-fry.

Lettuce and Lettuce Mix
To keep your greens fresh for the longest time, we recommend washing and spinning them as soon as you get home, then storing the loose leaves in a closed container or bag in the frig.
Melons
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Mushrooms
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Napa Cabbage
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Okra
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Onions, Green
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Onions, White
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Parsnips
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Radishes
Try slicing these thinly and serving on bread and butter, or saute them (plus greens!) – the heat will tame the bite and the prickly leaves.

Rhubarb
Here’s a delicious sauce to serve over yogurt or ice cream or your morning oatmeal: chop 4 c. rhubarb and add 1/2 c. honey or 1/2 to 1 c. sugar plus a dash of water. Simmer slowly until soft. Optional additions include strawberries, a bit of cinnamon and/or a tablespoon of tapioca for thicker sauce.

Radishes
Try slicing these thinly and serving on bread and butter, or saute them (plus greens!) – the heat will tame the bite and the prickly leaves.

Rhubarb
Here’s a delicious sauce to serve over yogurt or ice cream or your morning oatmeal: chop 4 c. rhubarb and add 1/2 c. honey or 1/2 to 1 c. sugar plus a dash of water. Simmer slowly until soft. Optional additions include strawberries, a bit of cinnamon and/or a tablespoon of tapioca for thicker sauce.

Salad Greens
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Shallots
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Spinach
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Sweet Corn
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Tomatoes
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Turnips
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Turnips, Hakurei
These mild little roots are great on a veggie tray, or sautéed briefly with their greens – the mix can be added to quiche, served on rice with chicken or tofu or mixed into pasta. If you’d like to store these for a while, it’s best to cut the greens off the roots and store them separately.

Watermelon
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Yams
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Zucchini
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